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Solid Fuel Use in Kitchen and Child Health in India


Affiliations
1 International Institute for Population Sciences (IIPS), Deonar, Mumbai 400088, India
2 International Institute for Population Sciences (IIPS), Deonar, Mumbai 400088, India
     

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Half of the world population uses solid fuel to meet its energy needs. Indoor air pollution from them is a significant source of public health hazard, particularly to the poor and vulnerable women and children. Though many studies exist on kitchen fuel and child morbidity, there exists limited literature on open chullah facilitates with chimney and without chimney as well as its effect on child morbidity and nutrition. This study analyzes the different types of solid fuels with respect to the place of residence and explores the impact of solid fuel use with or without chimney on child health. Findings suggest that the chances of using solid fuel varied widely across the place of residence and also show a high correlation between solid fuel use and higher incidence of respiratory illness. Mode of solid fuel use has tremendous impact on health indices. As the transition from solid fuel to clean fuel use takes longer time, it is essential to promote use of solid fuel with chimney as a short term goal to improve child health.
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  • Solid Fuel Use in Kitchen and Child Health in India

Abstract Views: 216  |  PDF Views: 2

Authors

Debolina Dey
International Institute for Population Sciences (IIPS), Deonar, Mumbai 400088, India
Aparajita Chattopadhyay
International Institute for Population Sciences (IIPS), Deonar, Mumbai 400088, India

Abstract


Half of the world population uses solid fuel to meet its energy needs. Indoor air pollution from them is a significant source of public health hazard, particularly to the poor and vulnerable women and children. Though many studies exist on kitchen fuel and child morbidity, there exists limited literature on open chullah facilitates with chimney and without chimney as well as its effect on child morbidity and nutrition. This study analyzes the different types of solid fuels with respect to the place of residence and explores the impact of solid fuel use with or without chimney on child health. Findings suggest that the chances of using solid fuel varied widely across the place of residence and also show a high correlation between solid fuel use and higher incidence of respiratory illness. Mode of solid fuel use has tremendous impact on health indices. As the transition from solid fuel to clean fuel use takes longer time, it is essential to promote use of solid fuel with chimney as a short term goal to improve child health.

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.21648/arthavij%2F2016%2Fv58%2Fi4%2F153076