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Decentralised Curative Health Service Delivery in India:Evidence from Public Expenditure Benefit Incidence


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1 National Institute of Public Finance and Policy, 18/2, Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area, New Delhi 110067, India
     

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To critically evaluate the decentralised public health service delivery in India, this paper analyses the benefit incidence from public health expenditure on curative health care provided as inpatient care for three states of Bihar, West Bengal and Kerala to examine whether the spending is pro-poor. Using unit record data of NSS, it compares two points of time, i.e., 2004-2005 and 2014- 2015, to find out whether the decentralised spending has led to improved targeting. The concentration curves and computed unit costs show regional and gender differentials across economic classes in access to inpatient health care.

Keywords

Curative Care, Concentration Curve, Public Health Spending, Benefit Incidence Analysis, Decentralisation, Regional and Gender Differentials.
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  • Decentralised Curative Health Service Delivery in India:Evidence from Public Expenditure Benefit Incidence

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Authors

Kausik K. Bhadra
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy, 18/2, Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area, New Delhi 110067, India

Abstract


To critically evaluate the decentralised public health service delivery in India, this paper analyses the benefit incidence from public health expenditure on curative health care provided as inpatient care for three states of Bihar, West Bengal and Kerala to examine whether the spending is pro-poor. Using unit record data of NSS, it compares two points of time, i.e., 2004-2005 and 2014- 2015, to find out whether the decentralised spending has led to improved targeting. The concentration curves and computed unit costs show regional and gender differentials across economic classes in access to inpatient health care.

Keywords


Curative Care, Concentration Curve, Public Health Spending, Benefit Incidence Analysis, Decentralisation, Regional and Gender Differentials.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.21648/arthavij%2F2016%2Fv58%2Fi2%2F141527