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Minimally Processed Fresh-Cut-Vegetables for Healthy Consumption


Affiliations
1 Department of Crop Improvement, Vanavarayar Institute of Agriculture, Manakkadavu, Pollachi (T.N.), India
2 Department of Social Science, Vanavarayar Institute of Agriculture, Manakkadavu, Pollachi (T.N.), India
     

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The consumers mind has changed now-a-days to an increased emphasis on quality and healthy consumption of vegetables. Generally, as per the consumer demand and convenient a simple methodology is followed for the preparation of minimally processed freshcut- vegetables. This paper highlighted the quality of selection, processing and packaging of processed vegetables as per the healthy issues. This direction of research in future helps to reduce the time lengthy of preparation and unhealthy consumption in the faster world.

Keywords

Fresh-Cut Vegetables, Minimal Processing, Process, Post-Harvest Losses.
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  • Minimally Processed Fresh-Cut-Vegetables for Healthy Consumption

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Authors

N. Muthukkannan
Department of Crop Improvement, Vanavarayar Institute of Agriculture, Manakkadavu, Pollachi (T.N.), India
K. Kalidas
Department of Social Science, Vanavarayar Institute of Agriculture, Manakkadavu, Pollachi (T.N.), India

Abstract


The consumers mind has changed now-a-days to an increased emphasis on quality and healthy consumption of vegetables. Generally, as per the consumer demand and convenient a simple methodology is followed for the preparation of minimally processed freshcut- vegetables. This paper highlighted the quality of selection, processing and packaging of processed vegetables as per the healthy issues. This direction of research in future helps to reduce the time lengthy of preparation and unhealthy consumption in the faster world.

Keywords


Fresh-Cut Vegetables, Minimal Processing, Process, Post-Harvest Losses.

References