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Medicinal Potential of Six Different Plant Species of Dehradun District, Uttarakhand


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1 Department of Biotechnology, Graphic Era University, 566/6, Bell Road, Clement Town, Ehradun, Uttarakhand, India
     

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Medicinal plants play a fundamental role in traditional medicine. In India, the use of plants as medicines predates written human history. Ethnobotany (the study of traditional people uses of plants) is recognized as an effective way to discover future medicines with low cost and low side effects. Our finding focuses documentation of some medicinal plants (Aegle marmelos L.(Beal), Saraca asoca, Syzygium cumini (Jamun), Ginkgo biloba, Camellia sinensis (Green tea) and Withania somnifera (Aswagandha) which have used in our traditional folk medicine and these species has some other medicinal property which is promising for researcher for the future. There are still various medicinal plant species that need to be examined for their medicinal potential. These approaches hold promise for treatment of several disease.

Keywords

Traditional Medicine, Ethnobotany, Aegle marmelos, Saraca asoca, Syzygium cumini, Ginkgo biloba.
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  • Medicinal Potential of Six Different Plant Species of Dehradun District, Uttarakhand

Abstract Views: 317  |  PDF Views: 2

Authors

Rahul Vikram Singh
Department of Biotechnology, Graphic Era University, 566/6, Bell Road, Clement Town, Ehradun, Uttarakhand, India
Prabhakar Semwal
Department of Biotechnology, Graphic Era University, 566/6, Bell Road, Clement Town, Ehradun, Uttarakhand, India
Taranjeet Kapoor
Department of Biotechnology, Graphic Era University, 566/6, Bell Road, Clement Town, Ehradun, Uttarakhand, India

Abstract


Medicinal plants play a fundamental role in traditional medicine. In India, the use of plants as medicines predates written human history. Ethnobotany (the study of traditional people uses of plants) is recognized as an effective way to discover future medicines with low cost and low side effects. Our finding focuses documentation of some medicinal plants (Aegle marmelos L.(Beal), Saraca asoca, Syzygium cumini (Jamun), Ginkgo biloba, Camellia sinensis (Green tea) and Withania somnifera (Aswagandha) which have used in our traditional folk medicine and these species has some other medicinal property which is promising for researcher for the future. There are still various medicinal plant species that need to be examined for their medicinal potential. These approaches hold promise for treatment of several disease.

Keywords


Traditional Medicine, Ethnobotany, Aegle marmelos, Saraca asoca, Syzygium cumini, Ginkgo biloba.

References