Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access
Open Access Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Restricted Access Subscription Access

Microorganisms Responsible for Wound Infection on Human Skin


Affiliations
1 College of Veterinary and Animal Science, Rajasthan, India
     

   Subscribe/Renew Journal


Skin is the major organ of the human body which plays a vital role in maintaining health of human being. Certain diseases defined as infectious or communicable or transmissible diseases are caused by pathogenic microorganisms. Some of the most common causative microorganisms related with infections include Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Enterococci, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Most of the diseases spread by the bacteria which invade inside the body through skin. Bacterial infections on skin are the common ailment for generation of other diseases in the body. Bacterial diseases are type of infectious diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria. Symptoms and complications related with bacterial infections such as chills, headache, wound, vomiting and organ failure generally affects the patient's life. Wound on skin can occur in all ages of persons and can causes harm in number of ways. Wound and skin infections represent the invasion of tissues by one or more species of microorganisms. These infections disturbs the body immune system and causes inflammation, tissue damage and thus resulting in delayed wound healing process. This article throws light on three aspects first on various types of microorganisms found responsible for causing wound infection on the skin, second on laboratory tests to diagnose the responsible microorganisms for wound infections and on choice of treatment for wound healing.

Keywords

Skin, Symptoms, Bacteria, Types of Wound Infection, Diagnostic Test, Antibiotics.
Subscription Login to verify subscription
User
Notifications
Font Size


  • Aitken W. Diseases of the Skin. In: The science and practice of medicines. Charles Griffin and Co. London. 1898: 877-81.
  • Cogen AL, Nizet V, Gallo RL. Skin microbiota: a source of disease or defence. Br J Dermatol. 158 (3); 2008: 442-55.
  • http://www.emedicinehealth.com/wound.htm.
  • Falanga V, Grinnell F, Gilchrest B, Maddox YT, Moshell A. Workshop on the pathogenesis of chronic wounds. J Invest Dermatol. 102 (1); 1994: 125-27.
  • Collier M. Understanding wound inflammation. Nurs Times. 99 (25); 2003: 63-64.
  • http://www.wikipedia.org/wound healing.htm.
  • www.mcnhealthcare.com/the-principles-of-wound healing.htm.
  • Calvin M. Cutaneous wound repair. J Invest Dermatol. 10 (1); 1998:12-32.
  • Ayton M. Wound care: wounds that won't heal. Nurs Times. 81(16); 1985: 46-50.
  • Lee G. UK scientists have identified a way of using light to rapidly detect the presence of bacteria and sign of wound. BBC News 2007 Mar 11; Sect. A: 4 (col.5).
  • http://www.wikipedia.org/type of wound infection and microbes.htm.
  • Harsh M. A text book of pathology. Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers, New Delhi. 2005.
  • Baker BS. The role of microorganisms in wound. Clin Exp Immunol. 144 (1); 2006: 1-9.
  • Lawrence C. The bacteriology of burns. J Hosp Aquired Infection. 102 (1); 1994: 132-34.
  • Steer JA, Papini RP, Wilson AP, McGrouther DA, Parkhouse N. Quantitative microbiology in the management of burn patients. Br J Dermatol. 158 (3); 2008: 422-25.
  • http://www.wikipedia.org/laboratory tests of microbes of wound.htm.
  • Heinzelmann M, Scott M, Lam T. Factors and tests to bacterial invasion and infection. Am J Surg. 183 (2); 2002: 179-90.
  • Plowman R. The socioeconomic burden of hospital acquired infection. Euro Surveill. 5(4); 2000: 49-50.
  • Ellis T. Treating the wounded. Primary Intention. 2 (1); 1994: 14-19.
  • Kingsley A. A proactive approach to wound infection. Nurs Stand. 15 (30); 2001: 50-54.
  • Cooper R, Kingsley A, White R. Wound infection and microbiology: medical communications. Johnson & Johnson Medical, UK. 2003.
  • Bowler P. The anaerobic and aerobic microbiology of wounds:.J Invest Dermatol. 102 (1); 1994: 105-07.
  • Costerton JW, Stewart PS, Greenberg EP. Bacterial biofilms: a common cause of persistent infections. J Wound Care. 3(4); 1994:208-11.
  • Cutting K, Harding K. Criteria for identifying wound infection. J Wound Care. 3(4); 1994:198-201.
  • Cooper R, Lawrence JC. The isolation and identification of bacteria from wounds. J Wound Care. 5 (7); 1996: 335-40.
  • Gilchrist B. Taking a wound swab. Nurs Times. 96 (4); 2000: 2-6.
  • http.//www.antimicrobial therapy for wound infection.htm.
  • http.//www. mechanism of action of antimicrobial drugs for wound infection.htm.
  • http.//www.wikepedia.org/antibacterial drug action for wound.htm.
  • Bowler P, Duerden B, Armstrong D. Wound microbiology and associated approaches to wound management. Clin Microbiol Rev. 14 (2); 2001: 244-69.
  • Anon. Local applications to wounds. 1. Cleansers, antibacterials, debriders. Drug Ther Bull. 29 (24); 1991: 93-95.
  • English MP, Smith RJ, Harman RR. The fungal flora of ulcerated legs. Br J Dermatol. 84 (6); 1971: 567-81.
  • Flanagan M. Wound Management: ACE Series. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 1997.
  • Krasner D. Chronic wound care: a clinical source book for professionals. Health Management Publications, Pennsylvania. 1990.
  • Collier M. A ten-point assessment plan for wound management. J Comm Nurs. 16 (6); 2001: 22-26.
  • Collier M. MIMS for nurses pocket guide: Wound care. Haymarket Medical Imprint, London. 2003.
  • Meara SM, Cullum NA, Sheldon TA. Systematic review of antimicrobial agents used for chronic wounds. Br J Surg. 88 (1); 2001: 4-21.
  • Collier M. Wound management: key principles for practice. Prof Nurse. 18 (4); 2002: 221-25.
  • Handwerger S, Tomaz A. Antibiotic tolerance among clinical isolates of bacteria. Rev Infect Dis. 7 (2); 1985: 368-70.

Abstract Views: 90

PDF Views: 4




  • Microorganisms Responsible for Wound Infection on Human Skin

Abstract Views: 90  |  PDF Views: 4

Authors

S. K. Purohit
College of Veterinary and Animal Science, Rajasthan, India
R. Solanki
College of Veterinary and Animal Science, Rajasthan, India

Abstract


Skin is the major organ of the human body which plays a vital role in maintaining health of human being. Certain diseases defined as infectious or communicable or transmissible diseases are caused by pathogenic microorganisms. Some of the most common causative microorganisms related with infections include Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Enterococci, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Most of the diseases spread by the bacteria which invade inside the body through skin. Bacterial infections on skin are the common ailment for generation of other diseases in the body. Bacterial diseases are type of infectious diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria. Symptoms and complications related with bacterial infections such as chills, headache, wound, vomiting and organ failure generally affects the patient's life. Wound on skin can occur in all ages of persons and can causes harm in number of ways. Wound and skin infections represent the invasion of tissues by one or more species of microorganisms. These infections disturbs the body immune system and causes inflammation, tissue damage and thus resulting in delayed wound healing process. This article throws light on three aspects first on various types of microorganisms found responsible for causing wound infection on the skin, second on laboratory tests to diagnose the responsible microorganisms for wound infections and on choice of treatment for wound healing.

Keywords


Skin, Symptoms, Bacteria, Types of Wound Infection, Diagnostic Test, Antibiotics.

References