Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access
Open Access Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Restricted Access Subscription Access

Insulin Therapies:Current and Future Trends


Affiliations
1 MET’S Institute of Pharmacy, Bhujbal Knowledge City, Adgaon, Nashik-422003, Savitribai Phule Pune University, India
     

   Subscribe/Renew Journal


Many patients with advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and all patients with T1DM require insulin to keep blood glucose levels in the target range. The most common route of insulin administration is subcutaneous insulin injections. There are many ways to deliver insulin subcutaneously such as vials and syringes, insulin pens, and insulin pumps. Though subcutaneous insulin delivery is the standard route of insulin administration, it is associated with injection pain, needle phobia, lipodystrophy, noncompliance and peripheral hyperinsulinemia. Therefore, the need exists for delivering insulin in a minimally invasive or noninvasive and in most physiological way. Inhaled insulin was the first approved noninvasive and alternative way to deliver insulin, but it has been withdrawn from the market. Technologies are being explored to make the noninvasive delivery of insulin possible. Some of the routes of insulin administration that are under investigation are oral, buccal, nasal, peritoneal and transdermal. This review article focuses on the various insulin delivery techniques. This article has focused on different possible routes of insulin administration with its advantages and limitation and possible scope for the new drug development.

Keywords

Diabetes Mellitus, Inhaled Insulin, Insulin Delivery, Oral Insulin, Technology, Closed-Loop System, Artificial Pancreas.
Subscription Login to verify subscription
User
Notifications
Font Size


  • Garg, S. K., et al. (2013). Use of non-insulin therapies for type 1 diabetes, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 140 Huguenot Street, 3rd Floor New Rochelle, NY 10801 USA.
  • Group, U. P. D. S. (1995). "UK Prospective Diabetes Study 16: overview of 6 years' therapy of type II diabetes: a progressive disease." Diabetes 44(11): 1249-1258.
  • Yaturu, S. (2013). "Insulin therapies: current and future trends at dawn." World J Diabetes 4(1): 1-7.
  • Rima B. Shah1, M. P., David M. Maahs, Viral N. Shah (2016). "Insulin delivery methods: Past, present and future " International Journal of Pharmaceutical Investigation 6(1).
  • Fry, A. (2012). "Insulin Delivery Device Technology 2012: where are we after 90 years?" Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology 6(4): 947-953.
  • Penfornis, A., et al. (2011). "Evolution of devices in diabetes management." Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics13(S1): S-93-S-102.
  • Shah, R. B., et al. (2016). "Insulin delivery methods: Past, present and future." International Journal of Pharmaceutical Investigation 6(1): 1.
  • Cohen, O., et al. (2009). "Improved glycemic control through continuous glucose sensor-augmented insulin pump therapy: prospective results from a community and academic practice patient registry." Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology 3(4): 804-811.
  • Burdick, P., et al. (2009). "Use of a subcutaneous inj ction port to improve glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes." Pediatric Diabetes10(2): 116-119.
  • Shah, V. N., et al. (2014). Closed-loop system in the management of diabetes: past, present, and future, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 140 Huguenot Street, 3rd Floor New Rochelle, NY 10801 USA.

Abstract Views: 62

PDF Views: 0




  • Insulin Therapies:Current and Future Trends

Abstract Views: 62  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Roshani Bhalerao
MET’S Institute of Pharmacy, Bhujbal Knowledge City, Adgaon, Nashik-422003, Savitribai Phule Pune University, India
Akshay Patil
MET’S Institute of Pharmacy, Bhujbal Knowledge City, Adgaon, Nashik-422003, Savitribai Phule Pune University, India
Dinesh Rishipathak
MET’S Institute of Pharmacy, Bhujbal Knowledge City, Adgaon, Nashik-422003, Savitribai Phule Pune University, India
Sanjay Kshirsagar
MET’S Institute of Pharmacy, Bhujbal Knowledge City, Adgaon, Nashik-422003, Savitribai Phule Pune University, India

Abstract


Many patients with advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and all patients with T1DM require insulin to keep blood glucose levels in the target range. The most common route of insulin administration is subcutaneous insulin injections. There are many ways to deliver insulin subcutaneously such as vials and syringes, insulin pens, and insulin pumps. Though subcutaneous insulin delivery is the standard route of insulin administration, it is associated with injection pain, needle phobia, lipodystrophy, noncompliance and peripheral hyperinsulinemia. Therefore, the need exists for delivering insulin in a minimally invasive or noninvasive and in most physiological way. Inhaled insulin was the first approved noninvasive and alternative way to deliver insulin, but it has been withdrawn from the market. Technologies are being explored to make the noninvasive delivery of insulin possible. Some of the routes of insulin administration that are under investigation are oral, buccal, nasal, peritoneal and transdermal. This review article focuses on the various insulin delivery techniques. This article has focused on different possible routes of insulin administration with its advantages and limitation and possible scope for the new drug development.

Keywords


Diabetes Mellitus, Inhaled Insulin, Insulin Delivery, Oral Insulin, Technology, Closed-Loop System, Artificial Pancreas.

References