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Tapentadol in Cancer Pain


Affiliations
1 Pulla Reddy Institute of Pharmacy, Dommadugu, Gummadidala, Sangareddy-502313., India
     

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Cancer and Malignant Tumors are the common term for neoplasms, where it leads to abnormal cellular growth which infiltrate, invade or spreads to nearby tissues. They eventually kill normal cells by nutritional deprivation. The cancer growth phase, treatment processes and after surgical procedures are all associated with many types of pain. The pain associated with any cause generally does not allow fast recovery of the patient as well as depression and anxiety are often involved with chronic pain. Thereby, cancer or tumor pain needs broad spectrum analgesic drugs against various types of pain. Analgesics like, NSAIDS, opioids and adjuvant analgesics are the drugs according to various guidelines are recommended against Cancer pain. Among all, Opioids serve the best for treatment of various types of acute, chronic or severe pain associated with Cancer. Even the nociceptive, neuropathic and breakthrough pain types are also better handled by opioid drugs.

Tapentadol is one such opioid analgesic having unique dual mode of action as an agonist at the μ-opioid receptor and as a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. It has been found to more effective as well as having fewer side effects because of its dual action. It also has been found with better gastrointestinal tolerability when compared to chronic NSAID therapy. By employing such new drugs and new strategies, the cancer pain can be handled effectively.


Keywords

Tapentadol, Cancer Pain.
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  • Tapentadol in Cancer Pain

Abstract Views: 45  |  PDF Views: 1

Authors

Nikunja B. Pati
Pulla Reddy Institute of Pharmacy, Dommadugu, Gummadidala, Sangareddy-502313., India
T. Swayam Jyothi
Pulla Reddy Institute of Pharmacy, Dommadugu, Gummadidala, Sangareddy-502313., India
Gajender Singh Thakur
Pulla Reddy Institute of Pharmacy, Dommadugu, Gummadidala, Sangareddy-502313., India
Sushma Reddy
Pulla Reddy Institute of Pharmacy, Dommadugu, Gummadidala, Sangareddy-502313., India
G. Meghna
Pulla Reddy Institute of Pharmacy, Dommadugu, Gummadidala, Sangareddy-502313., India

Abstract


Cancer and Malignant Tumors are the common term for neoplasms, where it leads to abnormal cellular growth which infiltrate, invade or spreads to nearby tissues. They eventually kill normal cells by nutritional deprivation. The cancer growth phase, treatment processes and after surgical procedures are all associated with many types of pain. The pain associated with any cause generally does not allow fast recovery of the patient as well as depression and anxiety are often involved with chronic pain. Thereby, cancer or tumor pain needs broad spectrum analgesic drugs against various types of pain. Analgesics like, NSAIDS, opioids and adjuvant analgesics are the drugs according to various guidelines are recommended against Cancer pain. Among all, Opioids serve the best for treatment of various types of acute, chronic or severe pain associated with Cancer. Even the nociceptive, neuropathic and breakthrough pain types are also better handled by opioid drugs.

Tapentadol is one such opioid analgesic having unique dual mode of action as an agonist at the μ-opioid receptor and as a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. It has been found to more effective as well as having fewer side effects because of its dual action. It also has been found with better gastrointestinal tolerability when compared to chronic NSAID therapy. By employing such new drugs and new strategies, the cancer pain can be handled effectively.


Keywords


Tapentadol, Cancer Pain.

References