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Role of Frontline Employees in Building Sustainable Customer Relationship-A Theoretical Approach


Affiliations
1 Berhampur University, Odisha, India
2 MATS University, Raipur, Chhattisgarh - 492010, India
     

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The basic prerequisite of any business is to know who are their customers, what are their needs and preferences, how their needs and preferences are fulfilled, are they satisfied with products and services offered and are they willing to further continue their relationship with the organization. In fact, there are several factors which influence the service performance; one of the most neglected issues by the organizations is role of frontline employees in service industries. Carlzon (1987) figured this interaction so important that he called it ‘the moment of truth’. Through this interaction, only a customer experiences the service delivered and develops perception about service performance of an organization. Hence, service providers are required to be friendly, sympathetic and adaptive towards the needs and expectations of their customers. The present study theoretically accesses the role of frontline employees, who are regarded as spokespeople in the company customer interaction, as well as being influential in the level of satisfaction of the customers.

Keywords

Frontline Employees, Customer Relationship Management, Service Industry, Customer Satisfaction.
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  • Role of Frontline Employees in Building Sustainable Customer Relationship-A Theoretical Approach

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Authors

Tapas Lata Sahu
Berhampur University, Odisha, India
R. P. Das
MATS University, Raipur, Chhattisgarh - 492010, India

Abstract


The basic prerequisite of any business is to know who are their customers, what are their needs and preferences, how their needs and preferences are fulfilled, are they satisfied with products and services offered and are they willing to further continue their relationship with the organization. In fact, there are several factors which influence the service performance; one of the most neglected issues by the organizations is role of frontline employees in service industries. Carlzon (1987) figured this interaction so important that he called it ‘the moment of truth’. Through this interaction, only a customer experiences the service delivered and develops perception about service performance of an organization. Hence, service providers are required to be friendly, sympathetic and adaptive towards the needs and expectations of their customers. The present study theoretically accesses the role of frontline employees, who are regarded as spokespeople in the company customer interaction, as well as being influential in the level of satisfaction of the customers.

Keywords


Frontline Employees, Customer Relationship Management, Service Industry, Customer Satisfaction.

References