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Prevailing Tenor for Ayurveda in Views of Ayurvedic Practitioners


Affiliations
1 Shivam Institute of Management, Gujarat Technological University, Ahmedabad - 382424, Gujarat, India
2 G. H. Patel PG Institute of Business Management, Sardar Patel University, Vallabh Vidyanagar - 388120, Gujarat, India
     

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There is a growing concern regarding fewer awareness and limited utilization of ayurvedic medicines and treatments in its own country of origin. Previous literature has focused on consumer awareness and preference in general but not specifically by gazing the views of ayurvedic practitioners. The present work is an application of both quantitative and qualitative research design. As the study aimed to pore over perceptions of Government ayurvedic practitioners regarding patients’ (is used interchangeably with consumers) awareness, opinion and degree of reliance in ayurvedic medicines and treatments. The study consolidated views of (N=62) Government ayurvedic practitioners. The result indicates that though trust, reliability and demand for ayurveda has increased recently, but still, majority of patients are aware of only the name of ayurveda, they don’t have any basic knowledge of ayurveda and its treatment. Number of regular patients is more compare to first time users. Tablet form of medicine is most preferred among patients. Moreover, they prefer to follow ayurvedic treatments to cure normal and chronic ailments as well.

Keywords

Ayurvedic Medicines and Treatments, Opinion, Awareness, Consumption Pattern, Government Ayurvedic Practitioners.
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  • Prevailing Tenor for Ayurveda in Views of Ayurvedic Practitioners

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Authors

Poonam Amrutia
Shivam Institute of Management, Gujarat Technological University, Ahmedabad - 382424, Gujarat, India
Darshana Dave
G. H. Patel PG Institute of Business Management, Sardar Patel University, Vallabh Vidyanagar - 388120, Gujarat, India

Abstract


There is a growing concern regarding fewer awareness and limited utilization of ayurvedic medicines and treatments in its own country of origin. Previous literature has focused on consumer awareness and preference in general but not specifically by gazing the views of ayurvedic practitioners. The present work is an application of both quantitative and qualitative research design. As the study aimed to pore over perceptions of Government ayurvedic practitioners regarding patients’ (is used interchangeably with consumers) awareness, opinion and degree of reliance in ayurvedic medicines and treatments. The study consolidated views of (N=62) Government ayurvedic practitioners. The result indicates that though trust, reliability and demand for ayurveda has increased recently, but still, majority of patients are aware of only the name of ayurveda, they don’t have any basic knowledge of ayurveda and its treatment. Number of regular patients is more compare to first time users. Tablet form of medicine is most preferred among patients. Moreover, they prefer to follow ayurvedic treatments to cure normal and chronic ailments as well.

Keywords


Ayurvedic Medicines and Treatments, Opinion, Awareness, Consumption Pattern, Government Ayurvedic Practitioners.

References