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Enhancing Metacognitive Skillfulness of Adolescents


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1 Department of Human Development and Family Studies, College of Community Science, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana (Punjab), India
     

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Metacognition refers to one’s “thinking about thinking” and is often defined by its accompanying skills such as monitoring and evaluation. Often researchers use metacognition as an overarching umbrella term but cognitive and educational theorists argue as to whether metacognition is a single construct or made up of distinct, differentiable factors. Metacognition has also been acknowledged as an abstract thinking ability known to enhance learning outcomes. The present research has made an attempt to assess the metacognitive skills among the students of the constituent colleges of PAU Ludhiana. The sample included 200 college students, in age range of 17-18 years. Metacognitive Awareness Inventory developed by Schraw and Dennison (1994) was used to measure the metacognitive skillfulness of the selected subjects and subsequently an attempt was made to prepare guidelines for parents and teachers to create a metacognitive environment since early years through daily interventions to strengthen their learning outcomes.

Keywords

Metacognition, Planning, Evaluation, Debugging
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  • Enhancing Metacognitive Skillfulness of Adolescents

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Authors

Parul Kalia
Department of Human Development and Family Studies, College of Community Science, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana (Punjab), India
Sarita Saini
Department of Human Development and Family Studies, College of Community Science, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana (Punjab), India

Abstract


Metacognition refers to one’s “thinking about thinking” and is often defined by its accompanying skills such as monitoring and evaluation. Often researchers use metacognition as an overarching umbrella term but cognitive and educational theorists argue as to whether metacognition is a single construct or made up of distinct, differentiable factors. Metacognition has also been acknowledged as an abstract thinking ability known to enhance learning outcomes. The present research has made an attempt to assess the metacognitive skills among the students of the constituent colleges of PAU Ludhiana. The sample included 200 college students, in age range of 17-18 years. Metacognitive Awareness Inventory developed by Schraw and Dennison (1994) was used to measure the metacognitive skillfulness of the selected subjects and subsequently an attempt was made to prepare guidelines for parents and teachers to create a metacognitive environment since early years through daily interventions to strengthen their learning outcomes.

Keywords


Metacognition, Planning, Evaluation, Debugging

References